• magisterrex Retro Games


    I've been gaming since the days of Pong and still own a working Atari 2600. I tend to ramble on about retro games, whether they be board games, video games or PC games. Sometimes I digress. Decades after earning it, I'm finally putting the skills I learned while completing my history degree from the University of Victoria to good use. Or so I think. If you're into classic old school gaming, this blog is for you!

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From 1988 – “Merry Christmas from Sierra On-Line!”

Back in 1988, Sierra introduced the Sierra Creative Interpreter (SCI) game engine, which permitted graphics in 320×200 in 16 colors, a huge improvement from the previous AGI (Adventure Game Interpreter) engine, which ran at 160×200 resolution.  The first three  games to enjoy the improved graphics quality were King’s Quest IV: Perils of Rosella, Leisure Suit Larry Goes Looking For Love (In Several Wrong Places), and Police Quest II: The Vengeance.  Sierra also sent out a new holiday season demonstration program to help computer retailers sell their wares (just as they did in 1986).

Merry Christmas from Sierra On-Line showcased the SCI technology with a festive Christmas carol musical score.  It was programmed by Teresa Baker (whose only other credited Sierra product was the aforementioned King’s Quest IV), with graphics by Jerry Moore (who helped animate many Sierra classics, including The Colonel’s Bequest, Space Quest IV, and Quest For Glory I: So You Want To Be A Hero, but was also involved in the Legend of Kyrandia series), and music scored by Mark Seibert.

As the Night of the Jolly Fatman rapidly approaches, enjoy this retro memory…and Merry Christmas!

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