• magisterrex Retro Games


    I've been gaming since the days of Pong and still own a working Atari 2600. I tend to ramble on about retro games, whether they be board games, video games or PC games. Sometimes I digress. Decades after earning it, I'm finally putting the skills I learned while completing my history degree from the University of Victoria to good use. Or so I think. If you're into classic old school gaming, this blog is for you!

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Restoring Old Game Systems – The Magic of Retrobright

As retrogaming systems age, their plastic casings sometimes change colour from white or off-white to shades of faded yellow and brown.  This can happen to a variety of systems, anything from an Atari ST to a Super Nintendo, from a Commodore 64 to an original Apple II.  This was due to the flame retardant process that prevented our Super Nintendo from melting into the floor during an intense game of Donkey Kong Country, which was much appreciated at the time, but can be a little annoying decades later as we wonder what happened to our formerly crisp-looking piece of retro tech.  There is a solution, but it takes a little work, and a mad scientist impression as you mix the various components together to make what its creators call “Retr0bright” but it appears to work magic*.  The recipe, ingredient list, instructions for use, potential pitfalls, and examples of success are available online.  Check it out for yourself HERE!

* As always, proceed at your own risk and with an eye to your and anyone else’s personal safety.

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One Response

  1. It’s not made obvious on the main page for retr0brite, but there’s a much safer, easier formula being used now that consists of Oxy[Whatever] laundry activator, water, and direct sunlight. I tried it on a few different things during late summer (an Apple IIgs keyboard & old Breyer model horses) and it worked extremely well.

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